Map of Daily Life

Photographer

Curator:Sujong Song

About the work

The camera may have documented everyday life in the Analog Era, but it now dominates daily life in the Digital Age. According to statistics from May 2015, two billion photographs are uploaded to Facebook each day on average. Although we press the camera button to take a picture so many times a day, there are also cameras filming us all the time. As of 2014, there were just over 200 million active surveillance cameras around the world. From smart phones to satellites, photography is tracking us at every moment. 

Map of Daily Life focuses on the relationship between people’s daily life and the countless photos that have penetrated our lives so poignantly. Anyone can become a photographer without actually taking a picture; a person can also become a subject without standing in front of a camera. Today, photographs swim in the form of light through virtual space without being printed on paper. As a result, in the time an image becomes a part of our everyday life, a photo can’t help taking on its very own meaning. Just as the border between art photography and snap photography has become blurred over the years, the authenticity of an event documented through photography began being doubted quite some time ago. 

Michael Wolf aimed to redefine street photography through Google Street View, while Penelope Umbrico provided insight into the phenomena of how one celestial body—the sun—is constantly reproduced and consumed through photos of sunsets uploaded to the Internet. Exhibits include the same breakfast menu repeatedly photographed every day and satellite landscapes of the Earth’s surface. Through daily life as seen through photography and the view of photography intervening in our lives day in and day out, the exhibition explores how a mechanical device like a camera combined with digital elements to expand the role of photography. 


1/